Communication between couples has changed dramatically over the past decade.  From face-to-face conversations with loved ones to disagreements over how much time someone spends online, social media has changed the way couples communicate. The Internet, mobile phones and social media have become key factors for 66% of adults who are married or in a committed relationship. Some couples use technology as a means of communication and support during minor or major events. The majority of couples also have a separate email and social media account.

The truth is: Relationships are affected by social media.

Using Facebook as a relationship capital.

Talk to each other when you are not in front of the public eye. Stop using Facebook as relationship capital to prove to others or communicate to others that you have a successful relationship. The whole world does not need to witness the dynamics of your relationship, no matter how good it is. It’s a quick way to turn your dialogue into a performance that deprives your connection of true authenticity. You also need something sacred for both of you (your dialogue) and put it there for consideration.

Expecting your partner to post or show how wonderful, amazing, smart you are on social media

What matters most to you, whether your spouse tells you that you are amazing or your spouse tells everyone how great you are? Have a personal conversation, telling them in-person is way more effective and better way to show your affection rather than penning down on social media about each other.

Capturing intimate moments and sharing them.

An intimate moment is no longer an intimate moment if you share it with the world. Relationships are sacred because of the limits and respect that surround them. Not all photos need to be uploaded to Facebook. It’s a slippery slope in which to rely on external validation to prove that your relationship is good enough, rather than finding the answer inside.

Use social media to have private chats.

Sometimes it’s easier to text something important to your partner on social media chatbox rather than sending them an email, text or calling them. But sometimes it’s really easy to accidentally publish your note to the general public instead of just your darling. Before posting something intended only for your partner’s eyes, make sure they are the only one who sees it.

The lack of attention and jealousy 

Married couples and people in committed relationships have seen their loved ones spend more time on their phones than spending quality time together. Some people are more concerned with instant satisfaction with the number of likes, subscribers and comments when using their social media apps. This creates jealousy and tension in the relationship. A loss of confidence can affect a person’s behavior during a relationship.

A person may be afraid of giving up and will tend to seek information because of their insecurities, according to the National Institute of Health study. The individual will also be less likely to trust people in general. In a relationship, this person will become defensive, sensitive to rejection from his partner and will behave in a destructive manner based on what he thinks is an experience of negative confidence. They will begin to distance themselves emotionally from their partner and seek out information confirming their suspicious beliefs in wrongdoing in their relationships.

Insecure partners will start searching their partner’s social media, cell phone, wallet, or purse. Sometimes suspicion will even lead them to keep track of their loved ones. These actions will create conflict and bad feelings of mistrust. Often, the significant other will begin to feel offended by being watched – as the other person will perceive as confirming their justification for suspicion.

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