Depression is a serious, generalized mood disorder. It causes feelings of sadness, hopelessness and worthlessness. Depression can be mild to moderate with symptoms of listlessness, lack of appetite, difficulty sleeping, low self-esteem, and low-intensity fatigue. Depression is a common but serious mood disorder. Symptoms of depression can interfere with your ability to work, sleep, study, eat, and enjoy your life. Although researchers are still studying the causes of depression, current research suggests that depression is caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Most people with depression need treatment to feel better.

Symptoms Of Female Depression

  • losing an abnormal amount of weight at one time
  • feeling weak or exhausted with no clear cause
  • feeling overwhelmingly guilty
  • feeling like you’re not worth anything or are inadequate
  • feeling anxious or irritable
  • losing feelings of hope for the future
  • crying without any specific cause
  • not being able to sleep well at night
  • having dramatic mood swings
  • having thoughts about death
  • Sleeping too much or too little, early-morning waking

 There are many reasons why a woman may have depression:

  • Family history. Women with a family history of depression may be more at risk. But depression can also happen in women who don’t have a family history of depression.
  • Brain changes. The brains of people with depression look and function differently from those of people who don’t have depression.
  • Chemistry. In someone who has depression, parts of the brain that manage mood, thoughts, sleep, appetite, and behavior may not have the right balance of chemicals.
  • Hormone levels. Changes in the female hormones estrogen and progesterone during the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, postpartum period, perimenopause, or menopause may all raise a woman’s risk for depression. Having a miscarriage can also put a woman at higher risk for depression.
  • Stress. Serious and stressful life events, or the combination of several stressful events, such as trauma, loss of a loved one, a bad relationship, work responsibilities, caring for children and aging parents, abuse, and poverty, may trigger depression in some people.

How is depression treated

Your doctor can treat depression with therapy, medication, or a combination of the two. Your doctor can refer you to a mental health specialist for therapy. Some people with milder forms of depression recover after a few months of treatment. People with moderate to severe depression may need treatment and a type of medicine called an antidepressant. Antidepressants change the levels of certain chemicals in your brain. There are different types of antidepressant medications, and some work better than others for some people. Some people only get better with both treatments – therapy and antidepressants. Depression can make some people more likely to turn to drugs or alcohol to cope. But drugs or alcohol can make your mental health worse and affect how antidepressants work. Talk to your therapist, doctor, or nurse about any alcohol or drug use.

Surrounding yourself with healthy, positive people is especially important in dealing with the symptoms of depression. If your friends, family members, or even coworkers are causing you stress or making your depressive symptoms worse, consider spending less time with these people or removing them from your life altogether. Family and social support is essential in being able to cope with and manage depression.

 

 

 

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