Does it matter if you make a mistake on your resume? It does. In fact, the fastest way to get kicked out as a candidate is to submit a badly flawed CV. Think about it: your resume is one of the primary ways hiring managers assess you as a candidate. Typos and grammatical errors can make you appear unprofessional and unqualified. Another big mistake: submitting a CV that doesn’t match the job you’re applying for. Doing this will put you out of contention for the job, both through recruiting managers and the talent management software they use to filter resumes.

Resume grammar errors

Brad Hoover, CEO of automated proofreading service Grammarly, reports that there are five errors on a typical job seeker’s resume, and most of those problems – nearly 60% – are grammatical.  The most common errors seen in CVs are:

  • Use of a hyphen (eg Entry level)
  • Verb tenses (e.g. led vs leads)
  • Formatting (for example, inconsistent fonts or different bullet styles)
  • Education information (for example, misspellings or incorrect use of apostrophe in a bachelor’s or master’s degree)
  • Careless misspellings (the most commonly misspelled words are single words such as “and” “planned” and “material”)

Be deceitful and dishonest

I totally understand – you want an exceptional resume that will impress hiring managers and guarantee an interview. So it can be tempting to embellish the truth here and there, especially if you don’t have a ton of years of work experience to emphasize. Remember when your parents always told you that honesty is the best policy? You might have rolled your eyes and brushed them. But, the importance of honesty is always true, especially when it comes to your resume. While it might not seem like a big deal to pretend you have mastered WordPress when you really don’t know anything about it, or to add an academic organization you’ve never been a part of, it’s best to never lie. on your CV. Being deceitful just won’t end well for you. Either you will be caught up in your lie and face a tarnished awkward reputation, or you will find yourself in a position that you do not have the skills to fill.

Writing a CV objective that does not match the position.

Avoid using an objective statement that does not correspond well to the objective of the target job. Many job seekers now leave a goal on their CV or use a profile instead. If you include either one, make sure it highlights your interest in the type of job you’re applying for.

Make it cluttered and hard to read

You’ve heard it a million times, and now you know it’s true: Recruiters are busy, busy people. Whether or not they use an applicant tracking system, they still have to take the time to sort through the pile of resumes that end up landing on their desks. Your CV should grab attention, but also be easy to navigate. As a general rule, keep the “30 second test” in mind. This rule states that recruiters typically spend 30 seconds or less looking at your resume. What does this mean to you? You need to make it incredibly easy for them to immediately glean the information they need without having to dig for it. Use bold headers for sections like your career summary, key skills, work history, and education, so that information pops right off the page. You can also use bullet points and clear, structured formatting to add more to the simplistic visual appeal of your resume.

Including too much information.

Don’t tell your readers everything about every job. Focus on the highlights; keep your paper on one or two pages, unless you are applying for a position in academia and research. (In this case, you might want to create a CV instead of a CV.) Use formatting techniques such as bullet points and short paragraphs to improve readability. Limit your resume to the last 10 to 15 years of work experience. You don’t need to include everything you’ve done.

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